The development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745.
The living history we offer insight into the development of society during this period. This is through the construction of a miicrocosm of society; we also make reference to the impact of the state and the Church on the daily lives of the people whose lives we are representing.

Society, economy and culture across the period: for example, work and leisure in town and country,
Bullace Hill shows the rural life experienced by the vast majority of the poulation in all its complexities. Economic and social relationships between masters and servants, the patterns of trade and manufacture in England's key textile industries, and recreations such as music, dance and games are all encountered.

Pupils should identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time.

Our Living History allows students to draw conclusions and make comparisons about the way we live now and the way they lived then. We often encourage these conclusions by asking the students about their own lives and pointing out the differences while in character. Allowing the differences and similarities to be really noted by the students.


The causes and events of the civil wars throughout Britain.

The characters of the living history can refer to what would have been their own personal stories regarding the Civil War and how it is affecting their lives. Please be sure to mention when booking that you are interested in the Stuarts rather than the Tudors.


Britain’s changing landscape from the Iron Age to the present
Bullace Hill provides a snapshot of the English landscape before the agricultural revolution of the 18th century. The formation of this landscape is a result of the activities that can be seen being carried out during the tour.


A study of an aspect of social history,

Our living history gives an insight into the lives of common folk and farmers of the Tudor and Stuart periods.  These everyday aspects such as washing and cooking provide students with elements students can readily identify with.


Changes in an aspect of social history

Our living history gives an insight into the lives of common folk and farmers of the Tudor and Stuart periods. This can be contrasted with the students everyday lives in the 21st century or with other periods of history. These everyday aspects such as washing and cooking provide students with elements they can readily identify with.


A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

Studying the Tudor and Stuart period extends pupils' knowledge beyond 1066.


A significant turning point in British history.

The English Civil War was a turning point in British history as the country was left without a King for years afterward! Bullace Hill Living History covers this period and gives pupils a hands on experience of life in the Civil War period.


For those schools constrained by the National Curriculum we have identified some of the main areas where the Bullace Hill Living History will assist with achieving the curriculum objectives.